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This volume of the Chiloccoan brings to 
you the message that the Indian boys and 
girls of the Senior Class of the Chilocco 
Indian Agricultural School are ready to 
take their place in the occupations open 
to American youth, or to continue their 
interests in the life which each will lead. 
As an appreciation of the opportunities 
that have made possible the Commence- 
ment of this class a part of the book is 
devoted to the achievements of the vari- 
ous departments, as well as the extra cur- 
ricular activities. 



Published by 
THE SENIOR CLASS 
of 
Nineteen Hundred and Thirty- 

at the 
Chilocco Indian Agricultural S 
Chilocco, Oklahoma 




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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/chiloccoanOOchi 




This volume of the Chiloccoan brings to 
you the message that the Indian boys and 
girls of the Senior Class of the Chilocco 
Indian Agricultural School are ready to 
take their place in the occupations open 
to American youth, or to continue their 
interests in the life which each will lead. 
As an appreciation of the opportunities 
that have made possible the Commence- 
ment of this class a part of the book is 
devoted to the achievements of the vari- 
ous departments, as well as the extra cur- 
ricular activities. 

May the message which this book brings 
strengthen the chain of interest and sym- 
pathy that must always exist between each 
of us and C. I. A. S. 



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In appreciation of his loyalty, his 
unswerving faithfulness to duty in 
the business affairs of the school, 
and his unselfish interests in the 
welfare of the Chilocco boys and 
girls the "Chiloccoan" of 193 3 is 
earnestly dedicated to 

MR. CHARLES W. HIGHAM 



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Administration 

Academic 

Agriculture 

Home Economics 

Trades and Industries 

Health 

Advisory 

Physical Education 




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Administration 




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Lawrence E. Correll. Superintendent 




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HEADS OF DEPARTMENTS 







R. F. Heagy 
Academic 



M. A. V. Smith 
Health 



C. J. Jordan 
Industrial Training 







Lizzie McCormick 
Adviaory 



C. W. HiGHAM 
Business 



Flora Maloy 
Home Ecot'.omics 






W. K. (iiiAV 
AKi'icultiirc 



H. S'. Kkli.ku 
Advisory 



iiA\ L'ol. GLAZIER 

Physical Education 




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Administration Building 




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Girls' Homes 



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Boys' Homes 




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ORGANIZATION OF DFPARTMENl S 

HE Superintendent is the administrator of the school, and is directly 
or indirectly resiionsible for every boy and girl, man and woman 
; attending school, or employed on the reservation. In direct con- 
nection with his office is the office of Business Affairs. This office, 
under the management of the Principal Clerk, Assistant Clerk, 
and three Junior Clerks, takes care of the numerous business affairs, .such as 
the considering of applications of would-be-students, the buying and issuing 
of supplies, the handling of funds for the children, and the paying of salaries. 

Seven other departments form the remainder of the plan. From each ol 
these departments come the Principal or Head, to make up an Advisory Com- 
mittee, whose duty it is to aid in keeping the whole unified. Scheduled meetings 
are held, with the Superintendent in charge, each member bringing the prob- 
lems of his department for the consideration of the vocational placements, the 
major behavior problems, student attitudes, and maladjustments. The instruc- 
tors of each department are responsible to their respective principals or directors 
Thus the whole plan is systematized, and the Superintendent is enabled to keep 
in touch with even the smallest details of the school. 

The Academic Department offers the work of grades seven to twelve, in- 
clusive, and is sunervised by the Principal of the Academic Department. Four- 
teen teachers take care of the class room instruction in English, mathematics, 
rhe social .sciences, and physical sciences. There is a well equipped library in 
ciiarge of an efficient librarian. The Principal's secretary looks after the office 
work. 

The Principal of the Academic Department also supervises the work of the 
\rt Depnrtment, which includes vocal and piano instruction, given by the music 
l-<^acher; band pnd orchestra instruments, by the orchestra leader; and the fine 
nnd applied arts, by the teacher of Fine and Applied Arts. 

A second division of the administration is that of Agriculture. The Di 
rector of Agriculture supervises the whole of it, but there is an instructor in 
direct charge of each sub-division. These include the poultry units, dairy 
;inimal husbandry, slaughtering and meat cutting, and field crops. Classroom 
instruction in the theory of farming is given by the Teacher of Agriculture. 

The Home Economics Department offers both theory and practice in all 
Dhases of home making, foods, clothing, child care, family relationships, home 
nursing, interior decorating, and vocational guidance. There is a Principal 
-if this department, and to assist her there are four other teachers. Under hei 
general supervision also, are the kitchen and dining room, although ihe cook 
and her assistant look after the food preparation, and the dining room matron 
and her assistant have charge of the serving. 

The work of the laundry, the bakery, the sewing room and mending I'oom ij- 
In charge of the Laundress, the Baker, the Seamstress, and Mending Room 
Matron, respectively. 

The head of the Vocational Department supervises the work of all vocations 
under the respective instructors. The sub-divisions are: construction carpentry 
repair carpentry, painting, masonry, brick and stone work, engineering, auto 
mechanics, blacksmithing, shoe and harness making, plumbing, and printing 
The actual work is correlated with classroom instruction, the theory of trades 
!)cng given by the Instructor of Shop Subjects. c„„ii,uuMi ...i pm^o- -Honor Sooirtv** 




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IDA ANDERSON 

Tribe : Choctaw 

Vocation: Home Economics 

LOUIS BAKER 
Tribe: Mondan 
Vocation: Animal Husbandry 

DOLPH BITANNY 
Tribe : Navajo 
Vocation : Acnifnii/ruKE 



MARIE ARNOLD 

Tribe : Delaware 

Vocation: Home Economics 

CPIARLES BAKER 
Tribe : Choctaw 
Vocation: Shoe Repairing 

MELONEE BROWN 

Tribe: Choctaio 

Vocation : Home Economics 



MARTHA BAILEY 

Tribe : Creek 

Vocation: Home Economics 

RACHEL BAYHYLLE 

Tribe: Pawnee 

Vocation: Home Economics 

RUBY BROWN 
Tribe: CJiickasaw 
Vocation: Home Economics 



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ALBERT BROWN 
Tribe : Choctaio 
Vocation : Painting 

OPAL CHILDRESS 
Tribe : Cherokee 
Vocation: Librarian 

MURROW COOPER 
Tribe : Choctaw 
Vocation: Poultry 



RUPUS CANARD 
Tribe : Creek 
Vocation : Engineering; 



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JESSIE CANOE 
Tribe: Cherokee 
Vocation: Home Economics 



CECIL CHISHLOM SUSIE CHOPPER 

Tribe: Creek Tribe: Cherokee 

Vocation: Special Agriculture Vocation: Home Economics 



NELLIE CORNELL 

Tribe: Creek 

Vocation: Home Economics 



LEWIS CURTIS 
Tribe: Cherokee 
Vocation: Ai'to Mechanics 




VIVIAN DAILY 
Tribe: Otoe 
Vocation: Nursing 



ELI DEERE 
Tribe : Creek 
Vocation : Painting 



ROBERTA ELDRIDGE GENEVA ELLISON 

Tribe: Cherokee Tribe: Choctaw 

Vocation: Physicai, Education Vocation: Home Economk s 



MAUD FOX 

Tribe : Cherokee 

Vocation: Homf Economics 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 
Tribe: Sac-Fox 
Vocation : Painting 



PERN DRY 

Tribe: Clierokee 

Vocation: Physical Education 

DWIGHT ESTES 

l^ribe: Cherokee 

Vocation: Auto Mechanics 

THERESANN GAREN 

Tribe : Iroquois 

Vocation: Home Economics 



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HOMAN GRAY 
Tribe : Creek 
Vocation: Poultry 

PARKER HARRIS 
Tribe : Chickasaio 
Vocation : Engineering 

ROBERT HICKMAN 
Tribe: Creek 
Vocation* Shoe Repairing 



GLADYS GRIFFIN 

Tribe: Cherokee 

\Accation: Home Economics 

JENNIE HARRY 

Tribe: Cherokee 

Vocation: Home Economics 

NETTIE HICKS 
Tribe: Euchee 
Vocation : Nursing 




HAROLD ffA^RmNG 
Tribe: Cherokee 
Vocation: Plumbing 

ARCH HICKAL-\N 

Tribe: Creek 

Vocation: Shoe Repairing 

AUSTIN HUGHES 
Tribe: Chickasaw 
Vocat ion : Agriculture 



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THURMAN HORNBUCKLE LENA IMPSON BENJAMIN JAMES 

Tribe: Cherokee Tribe: Clioctaw Tribe: Choctmo 

Vocation: Bakery Vocation: Physical Education Vocation: Poultry 



JOSEPH KING 
Tribe : Clioctaw 
Vocation: Poultry 

CECIL MATHEWS 
Tribe : CJiickasani 
Vocation : Encinrkrinc. 



RICHARD LIDDELL 

Tribe : Chickasaw 
Vocation: Auto Mechanics 

WILLIAM McAFEE 
Tribe: Choctaw 
Vocation : Horticulture 



ETHELINE LOCKWOOD 
Tribe : Ch erokee 
Vocation: Librarian 

ANNA McCRARY 

Tribe: Cherokee 

Vocation: Physical Education 



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WILLIAM McCRARY 
Tribe : Cherokee 
Vocation: Engineering 



FRED MILLER 
Tribe : Delaiimrc 
Vocation: Auto Mechanics 



OKEMAH MONTGOMERY HAZEL MONTGOMERY 
Tribe: Cherokee Tribe: Cherokee 

Vocation: Home Economics Vocation: Home Economics 




NORA NADEAU 
Tribe: Pottaioatoviie 
Vocation: Home Economics 



CHARLES NARCOMY 
Tribe: Creek 
Vocation: Carpentry 



IRENE MOORE 
Tribe: Cliickasaic 
Vocation: Home Economics 

ESTHER MOTES 

Tribe: CJioctaw 

Vocation: Home Economics 

FAYE PAYNE 

Tribe: Oicrokcc 

Vocation: Physical Education 




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FA YE PARNELL 

Tribe : Cherokee 

V^ocation: Home Economics 

JOSHUA PORTER 

Tribe : Pima 

Vocation : Animal Husdandry 

HANNAH ROY , 

Tribe : Ponca 

Vocation: Home Economics 



donnie parsons 

Tribe: Choctaio 
Vocation : Bakery 

lelis record 

Tribe: Euchee 
Vocation: Engineering 

JOHN SAM 

Tribe : Oicrokee 

Vocation: Special Agriculture 



VIRGINIA PATTERSON 

Tribe : Choctaw 

Vocation: Home Economics 

FLORINE ROMANS 

Tribe : Cherokee 

Vocation: Physical Education 

VIVIAN SCRIVENER 
Tribe: Chickasaw 
Vocation: Home Economics 



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JAKE SENOYA 
Tribe: Comanche 
Vocation: Printing 

LE ROY TAYLOR 
Tribe : Choctaw 
Vocation: Engineering 

VIVIAN VANN 
Tribe : Cherokee 
Vocation: Home Economics 




CHARLES STANDIFIRD 
Tribe : Cherokee 
Vocation: Engineering 

KATIE THOMAS 

Tribe : Creek 

Vocation: Home Economics 

BESSIE WALL 

Tribe: CJioctaio 

Vocation: Home Economics 



HILDA SMITH 
Tribe: Cherokee 
Vocation: Home Economics 

AMOS TIGER 
Tribe: Creek-Euchcc 
Vocation: Masonry 

BENSON WALLACE 
Ti'ibe: CJioctaw 
Vocation: Horticulture 




LEONA WELLER MITCHELL WEST 

Tribe: Caddo Tribe: Cherokee 

Vocation: Physical Education Vocation: Printing 



JOHN WILLIAMSON 
Tribe: Cherokee 
Vocation: Bakery 



GERTRUDE WOOD 

Tribe : Creek 

Vocation: Home Economics 

THOMAS WOODALL 
Tribe: Cherokee 
Vocation: Adviser 



JOHNNIE WOOD 

Tribe : Creek 

Vocation: Home Economics 

• \^ ROGER WORSHAM 
.' Tribe: Chickasaw 
Vocation: Printing 



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HXCi:KPrs J Kovi wm vALi:i)icr()HY 

HE CLASS OF 1933 Appreciates the many opportunities which Chi- 
locco has to offer. We realize that it gives the Indian youth a 
chance to develop his natural ability, create initiative, and also to 
develop him mentally, physically, and morally. 

We find that in order to grasp our opportunities we must require 
alertness to seize chances — responsiveness to slightest .suggestion of ambition. 
There are times when we cannot know what is the best thing to do until we 
have done something and checked up on the results. Under these circum- 
stances, the quicker we make a decision, the sooner we shall arrive at a sound 
conclusion. 

The greatest opportunity that comes to every boy and girl io vhai 'f ob- 
tainine- an education. Yet many girls and boys fail to grasp the importanc-^ oi 
this opportunity and leave it for others of far less value. 

Opportunity does not come to one, but you yourself have to make it by 
being satisfied with small things and willing to make of them things of hope. 

A person feels today that he could live a much better life if he could only 
live life over again. This makes him look back with regretful memory to the 
golden days of his youth and then he sadly mourns his wasted chances. He 
turns hopefully to the thought of a life to come, but in his blindness and ig- 
norance he does not realize that the new life is all around him and he has 
but to reach out and take a strong hold upon it. 

Opportunities are every where — in the air, in the earth, and in other vo- 
cations which are considered a small start. Opportunity is multiplying rapidl\ 
because the field of vocations is spreading widely. We can not reach oppor- 
tunity with. "T can't," but it has to be reached with an honest heart, which 
often beats beneath a ragged jacket, and two arms which are willing to attempt 
anything which may come our way. Josiah Holland in his poem '•Gradatim"' 
says: 

"Heaven is not gained at a single bound; 

But we build the ladder by which we rise 
From the lowly earth to the vaulted skies 
And we mount to its summit round by round." 
This n eaiAS that opportunity for success is not gained in a single task, but 
we have to build our ladder step by step from the bottom to our goal. To you. 
who are determined to get on in the world every circumstances in life may be 
turned to advantage The field of opportunity is a wade field to be too certain 
of higher tilings, for thousands of people pass by great opportunities in the shape 
of small duties and others come behind, who have little thought of srasping 
thing*? too far ahead and have woven their success around the things the majority 
thought to be worthless. 

The law of all progress is. "We must open the door next to us before the 
door ahead of that will swing for us to enter." From this we must reme?nber 
that nothing moves in this world until it is moved by some force greater than 
itself. 

It has been said that, "By the time a fool has made us his mind the oppor- 
tunity has gone by." The people who do things in this world make opportunity. 
They never have to wait, because they dig. fight, and give up all for it. 

— Virginia Pattfrson 




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ANNUAL STAFF 

Roger Wo^sham . .r ....: Editor-in-Chief 

Mitchell West Associate Editor 

Etheline LocKV/ooD — Campus Editor, Girls 

Austin Hughes Campus Editor. Boys 

Okemah Montgomery Activity Editor, Girls 

Joe King Activity Editor, Boys 

Florine Romans Sport Editor, Girls 

Amos Tiger Sport Editor, Boys 

Mabel Walker . Sponsor 

SENIOR GLASS OFFICERS 

Lelis Record ... President 

Gladys Griffin Vice President 

Virginia Patterson Secretary 

MuRROW Cooper Sergeant-at-Arms 

Ploiver IRIS 

Motto EXCELSIOR 

Colors PURPLE and GOLD 

Eynhlpw STAR 

Mascot Levi Gritts 

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CLASS SONG '33 

(Jhilocco is the best place in this work! to he. 
So, 1 know with me you will all a^ree 
And the best class in the Hi^h School 

Is old '38. (Jive three cheers for '33. 

Chorus 
Class '33, Dear '33, 
United now we stand, 
And A^e pledge our might, 
To do what's right, 
For the students of this happy band. 
So when you see the '33, 
R<^meraber who we are. 
We will pull together always 
And we'll hitch our wagon to our star. 

In tlio ''Purple of the Iris," all our class delight. 
Golden stars shine bright, keep our hearts alight, 
With love for Alma Mater and our class unite 
Praising our own '33. 




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Home Room Officers and Sponsors — Junior Class 

JUNIOR GLASS HISTORY 

HE JUNIOR CLASS, Whose record of attendance for this year is 
tJie second largest of any other class in school is sponsored by 
Mrs. Antone, Mr. Robinson, and Mr. Sturgess for their daily rou- 
tine of Academic work. The Juniors organized as a class November 
23, 1932, electing officers to assist in the leadership of the class. 
These officers are: President, Brewster Sunday; Vice-President, Robert Vic- 
tor; Secretary, Mary Smith; Sergeant-at-Arms, Louis Silk; Cheer leader, Solo- 
mon Morris; Pianist, Sadie Hildebrand; Treasurer, Mrs. Antone. 

The fol .-owing is the list of tribes and the number of students represented 
from each tribe: Arapaho, two; Arickara, two; Caddo, two; Cherokee, fifty-one; 
Cheyenne, four; Chickasaw, eleven; Choctaw, twenty-nine; Comanche, one; 
Creek, twenty-eight; Delaware, two; Euchee, one; Kaw, four; Kickapoo, one; 
Kiowa, three; Miami-Quapaw, one; Navajo, one; Otoe, three; Ottawa, one; 
Pawnee, eight; Ponca, one; Pottawatomie, seven; Pueblo, one; Sac-Fox, three; 
Sominole, three; Seneca, two; Shawnee, fiver and Wyandotte, one. 

Home Room oflicers from the class are: Irene Jacobs, Coowie Vann. Eva 
Rice, Pearl Sixkiller, Sadie Hildebrand, Grace Henry. Mildred Davis, Solomon 
Morris, Frank Vann, Austin Grant, Elzie Sockey, Leo Matheson, Charles Hanes. 
Anderson Chiklers, Daniel Beck, William Glory. John Thomas, Milford Parks, 
George Sam, Brewster Sunday, Homer Burgess, Carmen Griffin, Theda Douglas. 
Margaret Ross, Am.anda James, Christine Blueback. Hazel Logan. Irene Gard- 
ner, Lorraine Thompson. Celena Allen, Ola Woolridge, Beatrice Neece, Betty 
Hunter, Lilly Stanley. Stella Halley. Betsy Burns, and Rhoda Dent. 



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Home Room Officers and Sponsors — Sophomore Class 

SOPHOMORE GLASS HISTORY 

INCE T'HE Beginning of the school term, 1932-33, the Sophomore 
class has made more progress than in all of their junior high days. 
The class song was written and the banner was made this year. 
Their motto. "Forward Ever" is a constant inspiration to the whole 
class. The higher the goal, the more the Sophomores strive for it. 
The following students are the Sophomore class officers: President, Rubye 
vVilliamson: Vice President, Lorene Ross; Secretary and treasurer, Edna Reece. 
Mr. Morris, Mr, Albrecht, and Miss Hogg, are sponsors of the class. 
The following tribes are represented in the Sophomore class: Cherokees, 
' forty; Choctaws, twenty-one; Shawnees, three; Chickasaws, thirteen; Creek- 
Cherokee, ti"'ree; Yuma, one; Otoe, one; Creek-Seminole, one; Quapaws, two; 
Sac-Fox, one; Pottawatomies, two; Ottawas, two; Delawares, three; Cherokee- 
Seminole, one; Modoc, one; Creek, fourteen; Cheyenne-Arapaho, one; Aricka- 
ara, one: Seminole, one; Pueblo, one; Seneca, one; Miami, two; Kaws, two; 
Comanches, four; Caddo-Delaware, one; Kiowas, two; Caddo- Winnebago, one; 
Ponca, one; Apache, one; Peoria, one; Delaware-Cherokee, one. 

Home Room officers who represented the class in the picture are: Timmie 
Proctor, Gibson Starr, Lucille McMillan, Vivian Craig, John Terral, James 
"Byington, Perry Brewer, Troy Quinton, Arthur Lambert, Joe Ortiz, Ruby Wil- 
liamson, Lorene Ross, Mary Baker, Edna Reece, Efleadia Hearker, Susan Gritts, 
Bernice Spring, Lucille Thornton, Wetha Horton, Lorene Smith, and Betty 
McHenrv 




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Home Room Officers and Sponsors — treshman Class 

THE FRESHMAN GLASS HISTORY 

HE FRESHMAN CLASS May be green but green things are needed 
for growth. The contribution of useful and better things to Chi- 
locco is expected of the Freshman class in the future. Although 
green, the members of the class have stood side by side with the 
upper classmen in sharing honors of the school. 

The class consists of one hundred and fifty-seven boys and girls represent- 
ing twentj'-one tribes from seven states. The following is the number in each 
tribe represented in the class: forty-nine Cherokees; twenty-four Choctaws; 
eleven Creeks; four Chickasaws; six Caddos; three Delawares; three Comanches; 
four Euchet's; two Cheyennes; seven Otoes; eight Pottowatomies; four Sac and 
Fox; four Seminoles; one Sioux; two Poncas; five Kiowas; four Pawnees; four 
Shawnees; one Seneca; one Pueblo; three Kaws; one Cherokee-Shawnee-Del- 
aware; one Pav;nee; one Seminole-Caddo; one Cherokee-Delaware. 

Class oncers are: President. Leo Walker; Vice President, Lucille Edwards; 
?^ecretary, Libby Botone; Sgt-at-arms. Marvin Liddell; Cheer Leaders, Juanita 
Durossette and Sam Sanders. 

Sponsors of this class are Miss McFarlan, Miss Ahrnken. Mrs. Hensoy, Mrs. 
Morris, and Mr. Sturges. 

Home Room officers representing the class are: Sam Sanders, VVoodrow 
Trombla, Jack Montgomery. Rosa Lee Horner, Lucille Edwards. J. T. Smith, 
Raymond Harjoe, John Williams, Norma Anderson, Inez Quickbear, Jessie Lee 
Keyes, Bertha Jones. Leo Walker, George Baker. Marie Kekahbah, Viola Farns- 
woj-th, Juanita Duiossette, Wisdom Nibbs. John Conrad. Dan Pasey, Paul 
Jones, Otis Smith, Goldie Isaac, Mary Farrell, Howard Southerland, Addie 
Falls, Lor( ne Kihega, Edith Gardner, and Ike Moses. 




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FINE ARTS 

ART CLASSES 

The Fine and Applied Arts classes have an enrollment of six hundred and 
fifty students who are under the direction of Miss Opal Stuart, Art teacher. It 
is the aim of Art education to bring enjoyment of the beautiful in nature, and 
to give the child something to live by and with, so that even in this com- 
merci:^lized world of today he can see real beauty about him. 

The courses given involve appreciative and creative elements, as shown 
by the work which the classes have exhibited during the year. An exhibit 
of thirty plates, representing the work of forty students, in pen and ink, cray- 
on, oV. and \^ater color was sent to Chappell House, Denver, Colorado, for a 
displriy of Indian Art work of to-day. Exhibits were also sent to the public 
schools in Cheyenne, Wyoming. 

Two Art clubs, one for boys and one for girls, meet regularly once each 
week for the purpose of presenting specialized material to those who have 
ability and interest to carry on such work. These clubs also assisted in the 
second annual Pine Arts exhibit which was held in the Studio, 

PIANO AND VOICE 

Ihe training which Chilocco offers in music is under the direction of two 
teachers — Miss Irene Wilson, who teaches piano and voice, and Mi\ Peter Venne, 
who directs the band and orchestra. 

One of the foremost vocal music groups is the Choir, consisting of forty- 
eight voices. The organization of this group affords splendid training in co- 
opers ti on. and in developing a professional spirit among its members. The 
Choir provides music for Sunday services, special programs, and gives annually 
a caioling serenade at Christmas time. The cantata, "The Child Jesus," was 
presented at Christmas, and the operetta, "Ali Baba and The Forty Thieves," 
at Ccmmenoenient time. 

Opportunities for voice training are also found in the Glee Club for both 
boys and girls, as there are A and B divisions for each. In these groups are 
reprerented fifty-two girls and forty-one boys, A girls' sextette, and three 
quartettes — an all girls,' an all boys,' and a mixed quartette also provide music 
for many special occasions, 

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC 

Instruction^ in instrumental music is provided in the orchestra and band 
groups. The Orchestra consisting of thirty-four members, and the Band of 
forty five, anc beginners in the classes bring the total to one hundred and eight 
who are ^r.king either band or orchestra. 

The Orchestra provides music for socials and special parties. Among the 
ocassions for which the Band provides music are football games, parades, and 
the annual Commencement concert. In addition to playing on the campus, the 
Band makes trips to neighboring towns, some of which were to Ponca City to 
play before Vice-President Curtis who was making campaign speeches at thai 
time; to Hominy, Oklahoma, to play in an Indian fair; to Arkansas City, 
KansRs, to play in the annual Arkalalah parade; and to Blackwell, Oklahoma, 
to plriy on Armistice Day. 




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RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS 

HI-Y 

The Hi-Y is divided into two groups under the direction of two sponsors, 
Mr. Lnsiey E. Morris, and Mr. W. L. Robinson. 

The ni-Y Club aims "I'o create, maintain and extend throughout the school 
and community, high standards oi unristian character." Its dynamic leatures 
include a clean stanaard in living, in speech, in athletics, and in scholarsnip. 
Tne slogan is "Service." 

YOUNG WOMENS' CnRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

The Y. W. C. A. was organized at Chilocco in 1909, by Mrs. John R. Wise. 
Jn 1910. it had a membership ot tnirteen. The present membership is 130 in 
the older girls' division, and sixty in the Girl Reserves. The Y. W. C, A. is 
^•ponsored by Mrs. Jose Antone. 

Tne purpose of this organization is "To create, maintain and extend through- 
out the school, a strong, high moral sentiment, to develop character and pre- 
]jare tor Christian service." 

GIRL RESERVES 

The Girl Reserve organization takes care of the religious needs of the younger 
girls. Ihe organization symbolizes health, knowledge, service and spirit. Tne 
slogan is "To lace life squarely." The purpose is, "To find and give the best." 
This group is sponsored by Mrs. Hatt^e B. Ream, and Mrs. Chloa C. Morris. 

BAPTIST YOUNG PEOPLES' UNION 

The B. Y. P. U. has been established at Chilocco for eleven years. The 
7/ork is conducted under the leadership of a Baptist Secretary sent out by the 
Southern Baptist Mission Board. The aim is not only for personal Christian 
training, but to spread the program into other Indian churches. 

n_, METHODIST BIBLE STUDY 

Peligions work for the Methodist students has been conducted on Tuesday 
evenirgs, the girls and boys meeting in separate groups. The theme of the de- 
votional services has been based on living at our best. The work has been con- 
ducted by Miss Russell for the girls, and Reverend Baker for the boys. Both 
leaders are fron Pcnca City, Oklahoma. 

^ THE CATHOLIC SERVICES 

Mass 1( r the Catholic employees and students of the campus, is observed 
each Sunday at 7:30 A. M. in the art class room. Father Gisard of Newkirk. 
Oklahoma, officiates at mass. 

The first period of each Wednesday is given to religious instruction; at such 
times the Catholic students assemble in Mrs. Hensey's class room for a forty-five 
minute period of Catechism. 

' SCOUTING 

The Boy Scout organization has for its chief purpose, "The making of better 
citizens." His oath requires that he do his best, to do his duty to God and his 
country, and to obey the Scout laws, to help other people at all times; and to 
keep himself physically strong, mentally awake, and morally straight. The Scout 
motto is. "Be prepared," and his slogan is, "A good turn daily." 

The Girl Scout has as her motto. "Be prepared." and her slogan. "Do a 
good tvu-n daily." Her obedience to the Scout laws (much the same as those of 
the Boy S<;out) makes for a high type of citizenship. The activities of the Girl 
Scouts center about "homemaking, out-door living, and community service, aim- 
ing through these at character development and happiness." 

Both boys and girls have had experience in all phases of scout work which 
are chiefly: cooking, hiking, canii) life, nature study, safety first rules, i-rst aid. 
and i\y(' building. 




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Agriculture 




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JuNic^ High Plot Boys Cutting Oats 




A General View of the Eighty Acre Orchard 




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Leupp Hall — Girls Vo cational Departments 




Home Economics Cottage and Garden 




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AGRICULTURE 

HE COURSE IN Agriculture at Chilocco has been planned with 
the vocational aim definitely in view. The aim is to produce, not 
a scientist nor a specialist, but a practical, efficient farmer. The 
agricultural courses are based upon jobs actually done on ordmary 
diversified farms. They prepare the student to return to his own 
land, to adapt himself to his local conditions, and to successfully undertake the 
type of farming that must be followed there. 

The junior high school agricultural course has been planned with the idea 
of supplying the young Indian boy with a farm home environment. In the 
seventh and eighth grades training in all phases of agriculture is emphasized. 
There are two reasons for this general training. In the first place, the many 
boys v^ho leave school before graduation need a diversified training which will 
help them make a living for themselves on their farms. In the second place, 
the students who remain in school until graduation receive a thorough foun- 
dation upon which to build the complete vocational agriculture training offered 
in the senior high school division. Boys in the seventh and eighth grades are 
encouraged to find their "chosen work." They are brought into contact with 
every agricultural department. Upon entering the ninth grade agricultural 
students a'^e prepared to select the vocation they wish to follow during their 
three years of senior high school training. 

The senior high school course, taught in six denartments, is decidedly 
practical The tenth and eleventh grade students spend their vocational time 
in learning the practical, economic, and in most cases, the technical knowledge 
of their chosen vocation, along with all related training. During the senior 
year, in addition to continuing in his major course, the student may take Rddi- 
tioral work in every department he wishes. While taking this diversified work, 
the «^tudent is encouraged to keep in mind his own particular form, so that he 
may adapt his training to meet the requirements of the farming he will do. 
This part of the work derives its great value from the fact that it is done on 
a self-help basis. 

In addition to the regular school course in agriculture, Chilocco offers work 
in a special vocational department, created to meet the needs of the strickly 
vocational student. The aim of this department is to intensify the training 
program for the student, so that he may be placed in some employment, either 
for himself or others. To accomplish this end the special vocational student 
gives three fourths of his time to vocational preparation and one fourth of his 
time ♦^o c^ass-room instruction. All agricultural departments are open to this 
studert. 

The boy who comes to Chilocco to study agriculture may choose his vocation 
from n complete list of farm activities economically sound for this part of the 
country. 

The animal husbandry department offers training in feeding, breeding, 
selection, management, and marketing of livestock. The equipment for this de- 
partment includes twenty three hundred acres of pasture land, barns, feeding 
shedp, and silos of modern design and construction, and a good selection of the 
major breeds of livestock. This work is suitable for the ultimate project and 
is designed to m.eet the requirements of those who have the ambition of becom- 
ing bi^eeders of livestock on livestock farms. 




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The purpose of the dairy department is to provide the school with an 
abundant supply of clean, wholesome milk, and to give a vodational training 
in the principles of clean milk production. The equipment consists of the dairy 
barn, calf barn, milk house, and two silos. To make this training effective a 
project plan is in operation. The student working under this plan gives half 
of his time to his project and half of his time to instructional" work. He is 
given eight cows to care for. He does all of the woi'Jc in connection with the 
anim.iJs, the production of milk, the care of calves, the planning of a balanced 
ration, the producing and grinding of the feed, and the keeping of complete 
record:'.. The student's compensation is one fourth the value of the milk produced. 

The work offered in the department of field crops and soils includes crop 
productioii, crop rotation, crop improvement, crop treatment against disease 
and irsect pests, soil fertility, soil improvement, and soil management. Farm 
projects or plots are available to the boy majoring in this work, and make his 
course pra-^tical and complete. Each plot consists of seventy acres, and is op- 
erated by the student on the straight one-fourth-three fourths share return. 
All trnnsa'^tions between the farmer student and the school are on a strictly 
busmess basis. The student is required to work half time on his project during 
the school year and all summer with the exception of two weeks vacation. One 
fourth of all the crops he produces is his to sell; the remainder he delivers to 
the p'chool. This department meets the needs of the student who will become 
a diversified grain farmer. 

Thf» aim of the horticulture department is to give general, practice training 
in gardening, fruit growing, and landscaping. The work of this department 
encourages the improvement of the home ground and helps to make the farm 
a more ideal place on which to live. Orchard work lends itself to the ultimate 
project, and at graduation the student has a substantial beginning in the field 
of agriculture. . 

On the poultry farm most of the leading breeds and varieties of poultry 
are kept and bred for instructional purposes. The equipment includes many 
types of poultry houses, two mammoth incubators, and all types of small in- 
cubators which provide excellent facilities for hatchery work. Feeding batteries 
make pos<^ible the teaching of the most advanced methods of raising baby 
chicks. Training here is supplemented by exhibiting stock at local poultry 
shows and by taking part in local, state, and national judging contests. Poultry 
projects are available for boys who are interested in the work and intend to op- 
erate poultry farms of their own. The school furnishes five hundred birds, the 
necessary equipment and feed, and in return for operating the project the stu- 
dent receives one fourth of the total receipts. 

The meats department is excellently equipped for the killing of cattle, hogs, 
and sheep, for the handling of the carcasses, cuts and by-products, and for the 
tanning of hides. All of the wholesale and retail cuts of meat are prepared by 
the students. The student majoring in this department learns the fundamentals 
of killing, curing, and the conservation of meat on the farm. 

The student who is graduated from the agricultural department at Chilocco 
should have no difficulty in making a living on an Oklahoma farm. 




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HOME ECONOMICS A r CHILOCCO 

FACULTY OF THE DEPARTMENT 

Flora Maloy Principal of Home Economics 

Pearl Colglazter ..: Teacher of Home Management 

LncTLLE LiisK Teacher of Foods and Nutrition 

Margaret Riobdan Teacher of Clothing and Design 

Louise Hitchcock Teacher of Textiles and Clothing 

Ii A Scott Teacher of Foods and Cookery 

HE HOME ECONOMICS Department has gone forward this year in 
its development from several points of view. The addition to our 
faculty has made better distribution of work and responsibility 
possible and our new filing cabinets provide a place for illustrative 
and other reference materials adequate for good organization and 
growth. In all of our laboratories we have made more effort to check on indi- 
vidual achievement and have stressed the importance of the immediate appli- 
cation of. home economics information to everyday living. 

Classes in clothing have less construction problems and more study of se- 
lection than in former years, and emphasis is placed on the economic value of 
clothing renovation. The garments constructed determine the sewing problems 
and the grade determines the article constructed and elaborateness of patterns 
attempted. The home-made and the ready-made garments are constantly con- 
trast'^d in order to develop good judgment as to ths practicability and use of 
each. The following are the construction problems of each grade: Seventh, 
hand towels, pot holders, a kimona of figured broadcloth or sateen, and shorts 
of longcloth Eignth, a costume slip of cotton poplin or similiar material, and a 
gingham oi print dress with raglan or no sleeves. Ninth, sleeping pajamas of 
prints, a child's garment, and a school dress of gingham or percale prints with 
set-in sleeves. Tenth, school costume of shantung, cotton mesh, ratine, pique 
and Indian head ))rints; make-over problem in wool or silk; and a summer dress 
of flaxon, batiste, voile, handkerchief linen, etc. Eleventh, a wool street dress 
in staple and novelty weaves in season and appropriate to the occasion, and an 
informal afternoon dress and costume slip of silk crepe. Twelfth, a wool sport 
suit, two pieced and lined, of appropriate materials in season, and a graduation 
dress of voile, dotted swiss, cotton net, or organdy. 

Tn foods laboratories, food preparation and cookery are studied by the 
meal plan. Breakfasts for the family including planning, preparation, and ser- 
ving make up the work of the seventh grade, while lunches and their allied 
problems together with gardening and poultry units of four weeks each, make 
up the eighth grade course of study. The ninth grade make a study of family 
dinners. In unit kitchens there is splendid opportunity for teaching the sharing 
of home ^^ork by assigning the work of meal preparation to the 'mother,' 
'daughter,' 'father, and 'son' of the unit, and having each girl take her turn in 
these places by changing about each time there is a laboratory lesson. Good, 
but very informal family table service is practiced in the junior high school 
food^ classes. Senior high school foods classes gives more time to the health 
and nutrition value of foods than to the principles of cookery. In the tenth 
grade the course of study is built around the measuring of serving portions, and 
checking the caloric, mineral, and vitamine content of foods and simple menus. 
Girls of the eleventh grade learn to plan and serve foods on the different eco- 
nomic and occupational levels, and for families and individuals of specific 



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dietetic difficulties. Drill for the vocational use of the training received in the 
foods laboratory is the main aim of the twelfth grade classes. Individual 
practice is given in cooking and serving for special school functions, visitors, 
and classroom dinners to develop skill for possible placement in homes as general 
household helpers. 

Home management classes for the tenth grade furnish girls with useful 
knov/ledge for selecting household equipment and give practice in cleaning and 
laundering. While living in the practice cottage for a period of live weeks, 
eleventh grade girls demonstrate how to accomplish the regular and weekly 
routine duties of household accounting. How to apply the standards of good 
taste to the arrangement of furnishings in the simplest of homes, and how to 
select useful, attractive, and appropriate furnishings, as the income permits, 
are the principal aims of home decorating classes. They make a quilt block, 
decorate a pillow with yarn work, and help with some article of household linen 
on which hemstitching or a crocheted edge is used. 

The heme nursing and child care units teach care of the sick in the home 
and emphasize the importance of good home sanitation and regular habits of 
personal hygiene to disease prevention. Family relationships and child de- 
velopment, units of the twelfth grade try to point the way to the good lite 
through the development of wholesome personalities, while the vocational gui- 
dance unit aims lo give help in analyzing vocations and personal traits and apti- 
tudes ?o that the individual may continue her training toward the vocation for 
which she is best suited. 

For a group of sixteen girls, who for various reasons have been unsuccess- 
ful in their academic subjects, special classes are taught. These classes offer 
training in principles of cookery, simple nutrition, menu planning and table 
service, clothing selection and construction, and home crafts — somewhat ac- 
cording to the individual ability of the girl and her former academic grade. 

THE HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 

Margaret Riordan Sponsor 

Louise Htxchcock Assistant Sponsor 

Tlie club is affiliated with the American Home Economics Association and 
has the same organization as of last year. Its purpose is social and recreational, 
as well as supplementary to our home economics course of study. Some of 
our best progran'.'^ this year were: "The Installation Service." a meeting on 
"Interesting Travel Experiences" of some of our members, and "The Fashion 
Silhouette, Spring Colors and Fabrics," by Miss Ada Dewey of Newman's. For 
good times there were the fall picnic, the Valentine party, and a sunrise break- 
fast in the spring. The club has no membership fees but sells fruit cakes at 
Christmas and makes and sells Chilocco pennants throughout the school year 
for paying expenses. It received state recognition in February when Miss 
Riordan talked on "Aims of Home Economics Clubs" at their meeting during the 
State Teachers' Meeting at Tulsa. Marie Arnold was chosen as the best all 
round senior by the junior girls of the club and awarded the gold club pen. 




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Junior High Schoo:. Foods Laboratory 




Home Economics Club 




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Home Management and R :lated Arts Laboratory 



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Senior High School Clothing Laboratory 



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Trades and Industries 




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TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 

FACULTY 

Chestek J. Jordan Director of Trades & Industries 

Charles K. McClelland Senior Teacher of Shop Subjects 

Tnstnictors Departments 

Francis Chapman Printing 

Georgf O. Griffith Power Plan^ 

Jose Antone Power Plant 

POY E Trost Auto Mechanics 

Charles Fisher Farm Mechanics 

Roberi I. Griffin Painting 

Wfst Toineeta Carpentry 

Lambert P. Stoffel Masonry 

Charles T. Flem/ng Plumbing 

Georgl G. Rodman Shoe and Harness 

Henry J. Matfow Baking 

DUCATION IN THE Trades and Industrial department is the equip- 
ping of pupils with that which will help them to be more useful 
citizens and better prepare them to assume the responsibilities of 
men. With a wide range of trade shops engaged in production 
work like that in the respective trades in a small town Chilocco 
is able to offer every boy some line of training consistent with his aptitude or 
fitness. Not only does the boy have the advantage of acquiring the skills of 
a trade under an environment adapted to his abilities but in addition he is 
given all of the instruction necessary to give him a complete understanding 
of the trade processes to the extent that he will be able to compete in the field 
of employment. 

Every boy, d'lring the high school period years, needs to have the opportuni- 
ty to expe.vience those responsibilities and duties that will be his lot when reach- 
ing manhood. ]>.lo'st boys have the natural inclination and interest in things 
mechanical. The desire to create, build or repair is natural and the boy is fortun- 
ate who has the opportunity to work with tools and to discover his own ability 
in the doing of skilled jobs. He has the opportunity to think through a process 
and by such experience is better prepared to think out future problems. Through 
experience in typical jobs, representative of the different trades, given in an 
exporator> course offered to pupils at the beginning of the training program 
every boy is better able to select the trade for which he is best fitted. During 
the remainder of his training time he is able to specialize in the one chosen trade 
under the instruction of an experienced tradesman with the result that on com- 
pleting his course he is prepared to enter the field of employment. 

The trades instructors have not been chosen alone on the basis of their trades 
experience but also for their fitness to give the best results in an institution 
where education and training are the objectives. The training program and the 
routine of operation are under the guidance of a man who has had special ad- 
ministrative training in this field of work as well as having an intimate knowl- 
edge of trades work. With this organization every boy has the opportunity to 
prepare for entrance into a chosen trade. 



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Masons Learning to Pave a Road 




Student Carpenters Butlding the Horse Bahn 




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Related Subjects and Mechanical Drawing, Trades Department 




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Building Construction — Home Five 








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HEALTH 

HE HOSPITAL IS Maintained for the care and treatment of the 
sick, together with a dispensary for the treatment of minor ills 
and injuries. There are forty-seven beds available for the use 
of students with three graduate nurses on duty to render the 
necessary care and all patients are promptly examined by the 
Physician ana the necessary diet and treatment prescribed. A modern operat- 
ing room, and equipment has been installed which compares favorably with 
those of rhe adjacent towns. A physical examination is made of each stu- 
dent ind the findmgs are recorded together with recommendations to the 
parents as to the corrective measures indicated such as dental work, correction 
of defective eye-sight, removal of tonsils and adenoids or other foci of in- 
fection. In cases of serious illness and, when in the opinion of the physician 
it is indicated, a consultant is called and the family immediately notified as 
to the condition of the patient. 



HOME NURSING 

Each year six girls from the Junior class select the hospital as the place 
they prefer to work. The hospital takes only those girls who are strong physi- 
cally, dependable and capable of being trained to be of real service in the hos- 
pital during the two years they are with it. 

During the Junior year the Red Cross Hygiene and Care of The Sick is 
used as the text book. The girls are given from two to three recitation periods 
a week. If at the end of the year they successfully pass the examination a cer- 
tificate is granted them by the Red Cross. Their practical work consists of 
cleaning and dusting the wards and halls, and of keeping the clinics and oper- 
ating room clean. They are taught how to make beds, assist patients with morn- 
ing toilets, give bed baths, and to do many things that help to make a patient 
more comfortable. They learn to take temperature and pulse, to care for hot 
water bottles, ice bags, etc. They learn to prepare them for use. They study 
how to improvise articles in the home necessary in caring of the sic'k. They 
help make supplies for the clinic and operating room and assist in all the girls' 
clinics The seniors are often needed as assistants in the operating room. A 
part of their time is served in the kitchen where they learn to prepare and serve 
food, ?nd 10 help keep the kitchen and utensils clean 

These students work in two groups, each group being on duty a part of each 
day jind in school the other part. In this way they are a real necessity in carry- 
ing on the work in the hospital and at the same time they acquire knowledge 
and sk'll that may serve them well later in life. 










Advisory 




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Student Council and Group Leaders — Girls 




Senior Student Council Group — Boys 



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GIRLS ADVISORY 

HE SENIOR, Junior, and Sophomore girls who have been in Chi- 
locco di^ring the year 1933 have been domiciled in Homes Three, 
Four, and Five. At Home Three a number of the younger Sopho- 
more and a few Junior girls reside, many of them acting as gioup 
leaders for the junior high girls, who are much younger and need 
the assistance of the more experienced girls. 

The older Sophomore girls and a few Junior girls, who are group leaders, 
were living at Home Four until recently. These girls who are now temporarily 
housed elsewhere, expect to be back in their own home by early fall. 

The Senior and Junior girls have been in Home Five enjoying their new 
home and its modern conveniences. They have been making practical use of 
their lessons in Interior Decorating and Art by making pillows, cushions, scarfs 
and so forth. These are used to brighten their rooms, the reception room and 
office and make them more attractive and home like. They helped in planting 
the grass on the lawn and have cared for it so that it is rapidly replacing the 
barren look which surrounds all new buildings. 

In odd hours the girls of all three homes enjoy their radios, tennis courts, 
and play ground equipment. When not reading books of literature, magazines 
or newspapers, they are apt to be found out doors enjoying the sunshine and 
fresh air. 

House work has ceased to be drudgery and every girl does her bit in caring 
for the home without special assignment. In this way Chilocco turns out 
graduates who are able to keep an attractive home, make wise use of leisure 
time, and be a blessing to their home community. 



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BOYS' ADVISORY 

COUNCIL GROUP ORGANIZATION 

OYS ARE Organized into groups of thirty-two each — consisting of 
one Senator and three Councilman or group leaders. Through this 
system of grouping, we are able to control the movements of the 
student body, and to discover their interests and solve our many 
problems. The student is made to feel he has a part to play in 
making lile more interesting and helps his buddy solve his daily problems. This 
makes us one big family properly represented. 

Council Roster. — Senators: Ezekiel Starr, Leo Walker, Benson Wallace, Lewis 
Curtis, Lelis Recuid, Thomas Woodall, Earnest Tahquette, Grant Thomas. Ro- 
bert Fields. Senior Councilmen: Fred Shermn, Jonas Perry, Bill Cooper, Joe 
King, Brewster Sunday, Ted Maney, Gilbert Pepper, Herman Franklin, Henry 
Shaw, Earnest Kav/kins, Wallace Christie, Elton Armstrong. Junior Councilmen: 
Carl West, Frank Vann, LeRoy Kitchkommie, Arthur Condulee. J. T. Smith. Joe 
Washington. James Nowabbi, Bert Crittenden, Billie Delaware. John Williams, 
Junior Munsell, Tom Chisholm, Hollis Thomas, Harvey Jim. Leslie Cusher. Joe 
Harryba^ck, John Pitchlynn, Gasper York, Dowell Bowman, Beaman York 



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STUDENT COUNCIL 



STUDENT 
Harry S. 

Senators : 

EzEKiEL Starr 
Lewis Curtis 
Lelis Record 
Thomas Woodall 
Melton Perry 
Earnest Tahquette 
Marion Prim 
Harvey Jim 

Senior Comicilmen: 
Grant Thomas 
Fred Sherman 
Robert Fields 
Jonas Perry 
Bill Cooper 
Joe King 
Brewster Sunday 
Ted Maney 
Herman Franklin 
Henry Shaw 
Ernest Hawkins 
Fred Wheeler 
Wallace Christy 
Tom Chisholm 
BiLLiE Delaware 
John Pitchlyn 



COUNCIL — Bo?/s: 
Keller, Adviser 

Junior Councilmen: 

Sam Sanders 
Alfred Switch 
Frank Fields 
Adam Canoe 
Albert Conrad 
Carl West 
Frank Vann 
Eli Deere 

Leroy Kitchkommie 
Arthur Condulee 
J. T. Smith 
Joe Washington 
James Nowabbi 
Bert Crittenden 
John Williams 
Junior Munsell 
HoLLis Thomas 
Leslie Cusher 
Joe Hairyback 
Robert Cochran 
Gasper York 
Beaman York 
Dowel Bowman 
Floyd Lay 



STUDENT COUNCIL — Girls: 
Lizzie McCormick, Adviser 

Hazel Montgomery 
; Jessie Canoe 
. CoowiE Vann 
Betsy Cadue 
Eliza Parnell 

Group Leaders: 
Marie Arnold 
Bessie Wall 
Leona Weller 
Betty Hunter 
Vera Cantrell 
Alice Bobb 
Zila Pickens 
Francis Tinney 
Cora Miller 
Mable White 




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GHILOGGO 

{School Song) 

Oil Chilocco : Oh Chilocco : 
Where the prairies never end, 
Oh Chilocco: Oh Chilocco: 

You are still our famous friend, 
School of Schools you are the best, 
You're the school that stands the test 
You're the school that brings us fame 
Ever weMi revere thy name. 

CHORUS 

Oh Chilocco : Chilocco : We love your campus grand 
We love your lawns and shady v^alks where graceful 

maples stand. 
We love your sunsets and the stars at night reflected 

in the lake so bright, 
We love the cardinal's cheery call 
And the bright red maples in the fall. 

On Chilocco: Oh Chilocco: 

Ys here your old stone buildings stand. 

Oh Chilocco : Oh Chilocco : 

Ivy covered they are grand, > - v 

They are monuments of hope 

As we on learning's ladder grope 

School that makes our dream come true. 

We are ever loyal to you. 

Oh Chilocco : Oh Chilocco : 
When the morning bugle calls. 
Oh Chilocco : Oh Chilocco : 
We are glad to fill your halls. 
We come here that we may learn, 
Lite's great secret to discern, 
Teach ns how to work and play, 
Bring us something new each day. 



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Girls Basketball Team, 1933 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 

FACULTY 

Ray Colglazier , Director of Physical Education 

Mrs. Ifd Finefrock Teacher of Girls' Physical Education 

a^=v-.HE PHYSICAL EDUCATION Department has two separate gym- 
nasiums for the girls and boys. Each building is large, well lighted, 
well ventilated and modern equipped. All students are required to 
take physical education three periods per week unless excused by 
the school physician or the Vocational Guidance Committee. The 
classe.s are of fifty minutes length. 

The work aiven in classes include free hand exercises, annaratus work, 
tumbling, archery, folk dancing, tennis, track, and play games. Corrective pxer- 
cises i>re filso piven needy students. 

Girls and boys taking physical education for a vocation are given special 
instruction and classes are assigned to them for their practice teaching. 

Intramural games are provided in basketball, track and tennis. Inter- 
school athletics are sponsored in girls' basketball and tennis while foot- 
ball, bnsketball, boxing, baseball and track are included for the boys. 





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Football Squad 




Basketball Team, 1933 




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Baseball Team, 1933 









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Girls' Gymnasium — Interior View 




Boys' Gymnasium — Interior View 



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$ucl} Iioubs of lutcrcst aub hrtug to gou 

^tutorics of ti}t class of 

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